VaEra – Weekly Remembrance

לכן אמר לבני ישראל אני ה’, והוצאתי אתכם מתחת סבלת מצרים, והצלתי אתכם מעבדתם וגאלתי אתכם בזרוע נטויה ובשפטים גדלים. ולקחתי אתכם לי לעם, והייתי לכם לאלהים, וידעתם כי אני ה’ אלהיכם המוציא אתכם מתחת סבלות מצרים. (שמות ו, ו-ז)

Jews have a mitsva to remember the time our forefathers were enslaved in Egypt and how God liberated them and brought them to Israel. Every year in Passover, we recite the words from the Mishna: “In each generation, every person is obligated to see oneself as though he or she personally came forth from Egypt” (Pesachim 10, 5). We do this in various ways – in our daily prayers, during the festival of Passover – but we also do this every week, perhaps unconsciously.

In this week’s parasha God makes his promise to deliver the Jews out of Egypt using the famous four words of redemption, highlighted in the following passage:

So I say to the children of Israel: I am the Lord, and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will deliver you from their bondage, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm, and with great judgments. And I will take you to Me for a people, and I will be to you a God and you shall know that I am the Lord your God, who brought you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians. (Shemot 6, 6-7)

There are many interpretations of these words of redemption, but one of them provides an interesting comparison with other four words mentioned in the beginning of Shemot. The Slonimer Rebbe (the “Netivot Shalom”) says that when the people of Israel passed from slavery to freedom they uttered four deep sighs that came from their sufferings in Egypt. He identifies these”four words of sighing” in the Torah, again highlighted below:

And it came to pass in the course of those many days that the king of Egypt died; and the children of Israel sighed by reason of the bondage, and they cried, and their cry came up unto God by reason of the bondage. And God heard their groaning, and God remembered His covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob. (Shemot 2, 23-24)

These four utterances of sighing, says the Slonimer Rabbe, came from the depth of their heart, not as a prayer but as a sigh. They symbolize the four types of sufferings that they endured in Egypt, those of the body, the soul, the spirit and the neshama. By uttering these sighs, the people of Israel released themselves from these sufferings and thus became prepared for redemption.

The interesting point is that the Slonimer Rebbe says these things in his essay about the Shabbat, explaining how a Jew prepares himself for the start of the Shabbat on Friday afternoon. During the week we undergo various sufferings – of the body, the soul, the spirit and the neshama; but as we approach Shabbat we utter sighs and thus purge them from us, preparing ourselves to enter the holy day devoid of sufferings.

By drawing this comparison we are able not only enter Shabbat peacefully, but at the same time remember the four original sighs and the four words of redemption, thus fulfilling the mitsva of remembering our redemption from Egypt.

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