Kyushu Trip, Days 4&5 – Beppu & Yufuin

Kyushu Trip – Day 3 is here.

On day 4 I crossed the Kyushu island to the eastern side, to visit the hot springs areas of Beppu and Yufuin. Most of the rest of the trip, days 4 and 5, I spent immersed in hot onsen waters 🙂

Suizenji Garden

Before leaving Kumamoto, I took a morning stroll through Suizenji Garden. This oasis of calm in the middle of the city is a medium-sized Japanese landscape garden built in the 17th century by the Hosokawa family, the samurai who ruled Kumamoto at the time.

The route through the garden is a circular one. The features of the garden re-enact milestones on the Tokaido road, the road between Japan’s two historic capitals: Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo). This includes a mini Mount Fuji. Inside the garden is Izumi Shrine. This being the 4th of January, the first working day of the year in Japan, there were many groups of Japanese employees at the shrine. Traditional Japanese companies take their employees this week to shrines at the beginning of the year, to get a blessing for a successful business year.

Although Suizenji is not Japan’s most impressive garden (Konrokuen in Kanazawa comes to mind as a leading contender), it is definitely worth a visit. Admission is 400 Yen, and a leisurely stroll through the garden takes less than 1 hour.

 

From Kumamoto I headed eastwards to the other side of Kyushu island. I wanted to take the direct, and slower route, through the center of the island and Mount Aso, but the trains in that area are still not operating due to last year’s earthquake. So I took the Shinkansen to Kokura, and then the Sonic train down to Beppu.

Upon arriving in Beppu, I left my luggage at the train station and headed straight to hell.

Beppu “Hells”

Well, not literally hell, but rather “the Hells”, or Jigoku in Japanese. These are hot springs for viewing, not for soaking in. There are two groups of Hells: 5 in Kannawa and 2 in Shibaseki. I took a bus (no. 5) to the Kannawa district and visited all 5 Hells there. Admission is 400 Yen per Hell, or 2,000 Yen for a combo ticket to all 7.

The Hells (and much of Beppu and Yufuin, as I found out later) are very touristy. There are more shops and food stalls than actual Hells… But the natural phenomena are quite impressive to watch. Some are natural mud pools that constantly bubble; others are big ponds of boiling water, some blue some white; others are huge steam clouds billowing up from the ground. The air is permeated with a strong smell of sulfur. One of the Hells features statues of demons, presiding over the boiling ponds of water. Another is a small zoo, with an impressive collection of crocodiles.

With the bus ride there and back, a visit to the Hells takes 2-3 hours.

 

Takegawara Onsen

Back in Beppu city I checked into my hotel and then headed straight for the nearest onsen: Takegawara. This is one of the oldest onsens in the area, built in 1879, and it looks the part. I guess it’s kept this way in order to provide an authentic experience of the past. The attraction at this onsen is the sand bath. You lie down in dark sand and a lady uses a shovel to cover you in sand. It’s heavy, it’s hot, and frankly, it’s somewhat claustrophobic. I can now understand people who have a fear of being buried alive… After a few minutes, and some self-relaxing mind exercises, one can actually start to enjoy the experiend. Maybe. It’s all over in 10 minutes, after which you spend a while washing all the sand off and heading to the actual hot spring for a long soak.

If you go to any onsen in Beppu, don’t forget to bring a towel with you. Many of them do not supply towels, or do so for a fee.

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Takegawara Onsen in Beppu

 

Yufuin

On day 5 I headed westwards to Yufuin, another famous hot spring town. The ride there by bus (no. 36) from Beppu station takes 50 minutes, along a winding road up and down a mountain. But it’s well worth the ride, because Yufuin is a real gem.

Unlike Beppu, which has a rundown look to it, Yufuin is much better looking. Yes, it’s very touristy (it seemed like the town was invaded by Koreans overnight, as I saw thousands of them roaming the streets), but it’s not too “pushy-touristy”. It’s a very quaint town, with many shops offering local foods and products. In some parts it looks like a place out of a fairy tale, with small, immaculate houses and small museums. A leisurely walk from the train station westwards through the main street takes about 30-40 minutes, depending on how many shops you stop at to take a look.

 

And then of course, there’s the onsens. I soaked in two of them.

The first was Nurukawa Onsen. Here I decided to take a private bath. They have a big public and a few small private ones, which you can book for 1 hour (cost about 2,000 Yen). I bathed in the Sakura onsen, and almost fell asleep as it was so quiet and peaceful. The second was very different: Shitanyu Onsen. This is a basic, small public bath under a thatched roof, with two small pools (indoor and partially outdoor). Nobody’s there, so you put 200 Yen in a box at the entrance and go in. Apparently this is a mixed-bath, one of the few left in Japan.

 

At the end of the road in Yufuin is a pond-sized lake called Kinrin Lake. It’s very scenic, with a small shrine on the south shore, complete with a small Torii gate in the water. It is a fitting end to a visit to this serene town.

Back to Beppu I bid Kyushu goodbye by taking the bus to Oita Airport and catching a flight back to Osaka. Kyushu certainly is a place I intend to visit again when I get a chance.

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One thought on “Kyushu Trip, Days 4&5 – Beppu & Yufuin

  1. Pingback: Kyushu Trip, Day 3 – Shimabara & Kumamoto | Nafka Mina

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