Kyushu Trip, Day 3 – Shimabara & Kumamoto

Kyushu Trip – Day 2 is here.

Today was mostly a traveling day – train, bus and ferry.

I left Nagasaki in the morning to go to Kumamoto. First I took the train to Shimabara, east of Nagasaki and on the shore of the inner Ariake sea. You take the JR Kamome Line to Isahaya (20 minutes) and transfer to the local Shimabara Tetsudo Line (1 hour), a quaint yellow local train that ambles around the Shimabara peninsula stopping at many deserted stations along the way.

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Tetsudo Shimabara Line

Shimabara Castle

I stopped at Shimabara to visit the local castle, a 10-minute walk from the station. This castle was built in the early 17th century, along with the surrounding village. In 1637 it suffered a massive attack during the Shimabara Rebellion, led by Christians tired of being persecuted. Then, in 1792, a powerful earthquake followed by a giant tsunami wave, as well as a volcano eruption (the so-called Shimabara Catastrophe, 15,000 dead), hit the castle. During the Meiji Restoration the castle was deserted and only in the 1960s was the castle was reconstructed and it now dominates the sleepy town of Shimabara.

A visit to the castle is similar to visits to any castle in Japan: a few floors of the typical exhibits: swords, samurai armor, paintings, written scrolls, pottery, etc. And then the requisite observation deck at the top. To the west rises Mount Unzen, an active volcano, ominously shrouded by clouds, that last erupted in 1991. To the east is the inner Ariake sea, which I am about to cross with a ferry to get to Kumamoto. On the castle grounds is an exhibition of statues by a local sculptor, Seibo Kitamura, some of them rather disconcerting.

Admission to the castle is 520 Yen, and it takes 30-40 minutes to visit it.

Shimabara-Kumamoto Ferry

There are a couple of companies operating ferries between Shimabara and Kumamoto. The port (Shimabara Gaikou) is 3 stops away from Shimabara Station.I took the Ocean Arrow ferry, which runs six times daily. It takes 30 minutes and costs 1,300 Yen, including the bus ticket from Kumamoto port to the city (another 20 minutes).

Kumamoto Castle / Katou Shrine

Most of the sightseeing spots in Kumamoto are now closed to the public, following the two strong earthquakes that hit here last April (50 dead, 3,000 injured). Kumamoto Castle was heavily damaged, so it is fenced off, including the other sites within the castle grounds, such as the samurai Hosokawa Mansion. I took a walk around the castle grounds, and into the adjoining Katou Shrine – with its beautiful white Torii gate – which provided views of some of the castle buildings.

It seemed like many Japanese heeded the call to come to Kumamoto to support the local economy after the earthquake, because there were thousands of tourists on the castle grounds. Many food stalls, as well as the customary shrine stalls, were erected to help raise money. Kumamon, the local mascot, is everywhere you look. For those of you not familiar with Japan’s fascination with mascots, suffice it to say that after the earthquake the first reaction of many Japanese was: “Is Kumamon OK?”.

I’m staying at a business hotel near Kumamoto Station. Convenient for leaving with the Shinkansen, but if you plan to stay longer than one night in Kumamoto, a better location would be downtown, in the Shimotori area, where the alleged “longest shopping arcade in Japan” is located.

 

Kyushu Trip – Days 4&5 is here.

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3 thoughts on “Kyushu Trip, Day 3 – Shimabara & Kumamoto

  1. Pingback: Silence, by Shusako Endo | Nafka Mina

  2. Pingback: Kyushu Trip, Days 4&5 – Beppu & Yufuin | Nafka Mina

  3. Pingback: Kyushu Trip, Day 2 – Nagasaki | Nafka Mina

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